Advance Pre-final Movement Edition !
For Discussion and Debate on a ‘Not-for-Re-Publication / Distribution’ basis
The Movements of Movements
Part 2
Rethinking Our Dance
Jai Sen
editor
Volume 5
in OpenWord’s
Challenging Empires
series
OpenWord
and
PM
Press
New
Delhi
2017
Oakland
CA
From
The Movements of Movements, Part 1 : What Makes Us Move ?
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Please note that this is an advance, and pre-final, version of this document in a forthcoming book, as
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movements, we and as a part of a larger ‘Movements of Movements Book Organising Project’ - are making the
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So : If you want to cite this version of this document, please give the following citation :
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Sen, ed, 2017b The Movements of Movements, Part 2 : Rethinking Our Dance, Volume 5 in the Challenging
Empires series (New Delhi : OpenWord and Oakland, CA : PM Press), ADVANCE PREFINAL MOVEMENT EDITION
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See p 2 of this document for the Tables of Contents of both Parts of The Movements of Movements. Enjoy !
For your information, the final versions of the individual documents contained in this document will be / are
available in : Jai Sen, ed, 2017b The Movements of Movements, Part 2 : Rethinking Our Dance, Volume 5 in
the Challenging Empires series (New Delhi : OpenWord / http://www.openword.net.in, and Oakland CA : PM
Press / http://www.pmpress.org/)
The MOMBOP Team. For any questions or for further information about this essay / document or
the book or MOMBOP, contact jai.sen@cacim.net
So that you can see what else there is, in this collection :
Table of Contents
The Movements of Movements
MOMBOP Advance Pre-Final Movement Edition, 2016
Part 2 : Rethinking Our Dance
Invocations
Proem :
Shailja Patel Offerings
Introduction :
Jai Sen On Rethinking Our Dance : Some
Thoughts, Some Moves
3
Interrogating Movement, Problematising
Movement
3.1 Rodrigo Nunes Nothing Is What Democracy Looks Like :
Openness, Horizontality, and The Movement of Movements
3.2 The Free Association Worlds in Motion : Movements,
Problematics, and the Creation of New Worlds
3.3 Jai Sen Break Free ! Engaging Critically with the Concept and
Reality of Civil Society (Part 1)
3.4 Anila Daulatzai - Believing in Exclusion : The Problem of
Secularism in Progressive Politics
3.5 Josephine Ho Is Global Governance Bad for East Asian Queers
?
3.6 Jeffrey S Juris and Geoffrey Pleyers Incorporating Youth or
Transforming Politics ? Alter-Activism as an Emerging Mode of
Praxis among Young Global Justice Activists
3.7 Tomás Mac Sheoin and Nicola Yeates The Anti-Globalisation
Movement : Coalition and Division
3.8 Stephanie Ross The Strategic Implications of Anti-Statism in
the Global Justice Movement
3.9 Michael Löwy Negativity and Utopia in the Alterglobalisation
Movement
3.10 Rodrigo Nunes The Global Moment : Seattle, Ten Years On
3.11 Ezequiel Adamovsky Autonomous Politics and its Problems :
Thinking the Passage from Social to Political
3.12 John Brown Childs Boundary as Bridge
3.13 Chris Carlsson Effective Politics or Feeling Effective ?
3.14 Massimo De Angelis PR like PRocess ! Strategy from the
Bottom Up
3.15 Matt Meyer and Oussenia Alidou The Power of Words :
Reclaiming and Re-Imagining ‘Revolution’ and ‘Nonviolence’
3.16 Jai Sen Break Free ! Engaging Critically with the Concept and
Reality of Civil Society (Part 2)
4
Reflections on Possible Futures
4.1 Michal Osterweil “Becoming-Woman ?” : Between Theory,
Practice, and Potentiality
4.2 John Holloway The Asymmetry of Revolution
4.3 David Graeber The Shock of Victory
4.4 Kolya Abramsky Gathering Our Dignified Rage : Building New
Autonomous Global Relations of Production, Livelihood, and
Exchange
4.5 Muto Ichiyo Towards the Autonomy of the People of the
World : Need for a New Movement of Movements to Animate
People’s Alliance Processes
4.6 Samir Amin Towards a Fifth International ?
4.7 Rodrigo Nunes The Lessons of 2011 : Three Theses on
Organisation
4.8 François Houtart – ‘We Still Exist’
Afterword
Lee Cormie - Another World Is Inevitable… But Which Other
World ?
References
Complied, comprehensive Bibliography for The Movements of
Movements, Part 2 : Rethinking Our Dance
MOMBOP Advance Pre-Final Movement Edition
made freely available for Discussion and Debate on a Not-for-Re-Publication / Distribution basis !
Contents of this
document
About the book .......................................................................................................................... 1
A Note on the Challenging Empires Series ................................................................................ 4
The titles in the Challenging Empires series .............................................................................. 5
Contents ..................................................................................................................................... 6
Acknowledgements & Credits .................................................................................................. 10
Notes on the Editors ................................................................................................................ 15
Notes on the Contributors ......................................................................................................... 1
Some FAQs :
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copied electronic formats of this edition of the book. Please therefore respect the condition
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Why are you using HTML format for this edition of the book
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end.
1
About the book
Queremos un mundo donde quepan muchos mundos
[‘We want a world where many worlds fit’]
Subcomandante Marcos, spokesperson for the EZLN (Zapatista Army of National Liberation)
The world we live in today is in profound movement social, economic, political, cultural, and
ecological, as well as increasingly intensively, physical and spiritual -, that is to a large impelled by the
multiple and interlocking crises that we all face. This book is Part 2 of a two-part set titled The
Movements of Movements. The first part, What Makes Us Move ?, lays out a rich landscape
or movementscape of a wide range of essays from many parts of the world on the practice and
experience of movement. This second Part, Rethinking Our Dance, builds on that platform with an
equally wide range of essays (by authors from Afghanistan, Argentina, Brazil, Egypt, India, Niger, and
Taiwan, as well as from several parts of the North) that reflect intensely and critically on the practice
of movement and that undertake the task of addressing the question of what, in the emerging world
that we live in, of deepening crisis, do we need to do in order to bring about justice and peace ?
Looking at movements as the dances of warriors and here drawing on the lives and cosmologies of
aboriginal peoples of Turtle Island, and in particular on the seminal work of Taiaiake Alfred, a
contributor to the books
1
-, how can, and should, we rethink our dance ?
By juxtaposing a wide range of essays from different parts of the world that discuss how movements
move, in different ways and from different points of view each with its own cultural and political
cadence and rhythm , this book, along with Part 1, seeks to go beyond individual movements and to
both to make comprehensible the movements and praxis
of
movements and also to contribute to
learnings and movements of ideas
between and across
movements, including in terms of language,
grammar, and syntax. Conscious of difference and multiplicity, and committed to engaging across
standpoints, the two books together hint at possible meta-narratives of movements and their
intersectionalities, and through this hope to encourage and enable to readers to develop their own
meta-analyses of movement.
Along with the other volumes in the series of which it is a part (the
Challenging Empires
series see
the Note by OpenWord, in this volume), these books thus aim both to make the sometimes
bewildering range of contemporary movement more meaningful to the observer (and perhaps also to
those who take part), and also to be a space where movements can speak to each other : Where
multidirectional and transcommunal conversations can open up, both between and across movements
and also between movements and readers, and where it becomes possible for all to begin to perceive
the nature, vastness, and richness of the universe of movement in our times. And through this, and
by working with the diverse politico-cultural compositions that the essays are and by composing a
larger whole, it hopes also to begin to make comprehensible the music and dance of movement, and
of a world in movement.
Collectively, the 50 essays in these two books range from re-theorisations of struggles at and from
the margins to ones on liberation and the recovery of self, feminisms, queerdom, struggles of faith,
the struggles of workers, and on re-imagining the world and ‘forward dreaming’; and much more.
In order to present and make available as wide a range of movements as possible, and to make these
essays as accessible as we can, we are publishing The Movements of Movements in two parts.
The first volume the companion volume to this one - Part 1 : What Makes Us Move ?, has two
sections, titled ‘Movementscapes’ and ‘The Movements of Movements : Struggles for Other Worlds’,
with a rich range of presentations and reflections on movements during the period 2006-2010, and a
major Afterword critically engaging with all the essays. Together, this collection provides a very broad
basis for this journey and analysis and a deep perspective for comprehending the moment in history
we are today in and attempting to answer the question of ‘What makes us move ?’.
In turn, this book, Part 2 : Rethinking Our Dance, also has two main Sections that carry forward
1
Taiaiake Alfred, 2005
Wasáse
: Indigenous Pathways of Action and Freedom. Peterborough : Broadview
Press.
2
the discussions opened in Part 1, titled ‘Interrogating Movement, Problematising Movement’ and
‘Reflections on Possible Futures’. And as with Part 1, this book also has a major Afterword that looks
at the moment in history we are today at and the emerging future, and critically discusses the themes
of the essays in both books in these terms and in terms of the meanings of movement(s) in our
times.
Contributors to The Movements of Movements, Part 1 : What Makes Us Move ? :
Taiaiake Alfred, Tariq Ali, the late Daniel Bensaïd, Cho Hee-Yeon, Ashok Choudhary, Lee Cormie, Jeff
Corntassel, Laurence Cox, Guillermo Delgado-P, Andre Drainville, David Featherstone, Christopher
Gunderson, Emilie Hayes, François Houtart, Fouad Kalouche, Alex Khasnabish, Xochitl Leyva Solano,
Roma Malik, David McNally, Roel Meijer, Eric Mielants, Peter North, Shailja Patel, Emir Sader, Jai Sen,
Andrea Smith, Anand Teltumbde, James Toth, Virginia Vargas, and Peter Waterman
Contributors to Rethinking Our Dance : The Movements of Movements, Part 2 :
Kolya Abramsky, Ezequiel Adamovsky, Oussenia Alidou, Samir Amin, Chris Carlsson, John Brown
Childs, Lee Cormie, Anila Daulatzai, Massimo De Angelis, The Free Association, David Graeber,
Josephine Ho, John Holloway, François Houtart, Jeffrey Juris, Michael Löwy, Tomás Mac Sheoin, Matt
Meyer, Muto Ichiyo, Rodrigo Nunes, Michal Osterweil, Shailja Patel, Geoffrey Pleyers, Stephanie Ross,
Jai Sen, and Nicola Yeates
Some advance comments :
Someone once suggested that movement cannot be thought, it has to be lived. In other words, social
movements the coming together in processes that build the power to bring about change stem
not from any kind of blue-print that can set out an ideal for the world we ought to live in; nor can
there be a simple step-by-step guide on how to get there. At the same time, there can’t be
movement without a collective effort to understand the shared and embodied experiences that
constitute it, along with the problems, concerns and trajectories that arise in struggle. It’s this kind of
critical reflection that the authors assembled in this volume undertake, providing intelligent and
engaged analyses that avoid any stifling dichotomies - whether between theory and practice, activism
and academia, or indeed between thinking and feeling. Possible futures right now in the making
become legible in how ‘The Movement of Movements’ doesn’t shy away from the complex and
unsettling issues that shape our time while thinking through struggles for social and ecological justice
in the wider contexts of their past and present.
Emma Dowling is Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Middlesex University, London, UK.
Her current work is concerned with the politics of the global financial crisis
This collection offers a thought-provoking opportunity to parse multiplicities and recent directions in
global justice organizing. Sen's framing in this book sets us up to take stock of two decades of social
and political movement in terms of dynamic motion : Not only as strategy and organization, but as
kinaesthetic experience, embodied transformation through space and time. This agile cluster of
contributors leads us through the cumulative dialectic of zapatismo, altermondialisme, and their
various permutations and relations in resistance to global capitalism, guiding the steps of the social
dance repeatedly back to earth from the ethereal spaces of hypermobile globality to place feet on the
ground in the most deeply rooted sites of embedded struggle. But the ground has kept shifting too,
calling up new motifs in the music of alternative worlds : The nuanced, critical emphases on
indigeneity, spirituality, gender and ecology, rich with specificity and insight, locate us unmistakably
in our present moment with its lessons gleaned of recent history and praxis, even while bringing us
full circle to the themes introduced an unbelievable twenty years ago. We shall not be moved. We
shall move. We shall keep moving.
3
Maia Ramnath is a teacher, writer, activist, and dancer/aerialist. She is the author
of Decolonizing Anarchism : An Anti-Authoritarian History of India’s Liberation
Struggle (2012) and The Haj to Utopia : How the Ghadar Movement Charted Global
Radicalism and Attempted to Overthrow the British Empire (2011), is currently a
member of the Institute for Anarchist Studies board, and teaches history at Penn
State University in the US
Edited by Jai Sen, who has long occupied a central position in an international network of intellectuals
and activists in movement, this is an important contribution to a developing internationalism that
doesn’t assume that the North Atlantic left has all the answers for the rest of the world and which
recognizes that emancipatory ideas and practices are often forged from below. The dazzling diversity
of ideas and experiences recorded in this extraordinary book really captures something of the fluidity
and diversity within the actually existing movements of movements struggling for a more just world.
This book, refreshingly free of tired dogmas, non-sectarian, taking internationalism seriously, and
reaching back to 1968, provides a bracing window into some of the central ideas to have emerged
from within movements in the sequence of struggle that unfolded from 2006 to 2010.
The essays here range across the globe, look at the politics of caste, class, gender, religion and
indigeneity, and move from the local to the global. This book will be useful for activists and
intellectuals in movement - be they in universities, parties, trade unions, social movements or
religious organisations around the world.
Richard Pithouse teaches politics at Rhodes University in Grahamstown, South
Africa. He is a widely published and translated intellectual whose work is rooted in
day-to-day participation in popular struggles
4
From OpenWord :
A Note on the
Challenging Empires
Series
The
Challenging Empires
series emerged out of an extremely successful book that the lead
editor of the present work, Jai Sen, brought out along with Peter Waterman, Arturo Escobar, and
Anita Anand in 2004. Titled World Social Forum : Challenging Empires, this major anthology of essays
from many parts of the world, and from authors of many different persuasions, critically examined the
World Social Forum and the global debates around this phenomenon and located them in relation to
the 2004 edition of the WSF that was held in Mumbai, India.
This book managed to accomplish, in large measure, the task it had set out to do, and was
then also translated into German, Hindi, Japanese, and Spanish over the subsequent years, as well as
most of the chapters of the original version in English being made available online almost at the same
time as the hard copy. In 2008-9, it was updated into a revised, updated, second major international
edition published from Canada.
The success of these books prompted the lead editors of the 2004 book, Jai Sen and Peter
Waterman, to conceive of a series of volumes around contemporary social movement that could
critically evaluate their impact and trace their history both at local levels as what sometimes seem to
be isolated, localised phenomena and as streams of solidarity efforts regionally and globally such as
the World Social Forum -, and to publish these through OpenWord. Together, the new series editors
and OpenWord named the series
Challenging Empires.
The first subsequent volume in the new series was World Social Forum : Critical Explorations,
published by OpenWord in 2012.
2
With the first and second editions of World Social Forum :
Challenging Empires being seen as the first two volumes in the new series, Critical Explorations was
nicknamed CE3.
The next intervention in this process is this major two-part set of books, collectively titled
The Movements of Movements. Whereas CE3 was about the World Social Forum, these two
volumes - The Movements of Movements, Part 1 : What Makes Us Move ?, and its companion
volume The Movements of Movements, Part 2 : Rethinking Our Dance - are appearing at a
time when movements for social change and justice have become dramatically visible almost all over
the world. Focussing on the period 2006-2010 but also reaching back to 1968 and earlier, and
forward right up to 2014-15, and including some that discuss the World Social Forum, the books bring
together some 50 outstanding essays on the epistemological landscape and praxis of movement,
generically. With the essays again as in CE1, CE2, and CE3 - by authors from many parts of the
world and of different ages, races, and persuasions, and with the essays themselves focussing on a
wide range of movements, the books are a major attempt at opening and deepening conversations
between and across movements, and in drawing readers into the conversations. Like its predecessors,
they thus open up many debates for movements across the world, and hopefully will also contribute
to conversations between them. These volumes thus go far beyond the WSF and lead the
Challenging
Empires
series into looking at other more spontaneous, structured, and virtual movements. In terms
of series numbering, these are Volumes 4 and 5 in the
Challenging Empires
series, and series-wise,
are nicknamed CE4 and CE5 (and are also known as MOM1 and MOM2)
By virtue of the size and ambition of this collection, we are bringing The Movements of
Movements out in two parts and co-publishing it with an important new actor in international
publishing around movement, PM Press. Whereas Part 1 focuses on laying out and discussing the
landscape of contemporary movement and on presenting and juxtaposing a wide range of
movements for change, this volume, Part 2, complements Part 1 and focuses on reflecting on and
interrogating movement and on discussions of possible futures. Both books end with a major essay,
appearing as Afterwords, that reflects across the collection and critically locates these collections of
essays in relation to the world we live in and that is emerging in our times.
OpenWord, the publisher of the
Challenging Empires
series, and the series editors welcome
suggestions and criticism on the volumes that have come out. Feel free to send your suggestions
either to the series editor(s) see the ‘Notes on the Editors’ for their details - or to OpenWord
through its website www.openword.in.
2
Sen and Waterman, eds, 2012.
5
The titles in the
Challenging Empires
series
Series editors : Jai Sen and Peter Waterman
All to soon be available @ OpenWord
Volume 1
World Social Forum : Challenging Empires
Edited by Jai Sen, Anita Anand, Arturo Escobar, and Peter Waterman
Viveka Foundation, New Delhi, India, 2004
(Slightly abridged versions available
@ http://www.choike.org/nuevo_eng/informes/1557.html
and @ http://www.openspaceforum.net/twiki/tiki-
index.php?page=WSFChallengingEmpires2004)
Volume 2
World Social Forum : Challenging Empires
Updated and revised International Edition
Edited by Jai Sen and Peter Waterman
Black Rose Books, Montreal, Canada, 2009
http://blackrosebooks.net/products/view/WORLD+SOCIAL+FORUM/32439
Volume 3
World Social Forum : Critical Explorations
Edited by Jai Sen and Peter Waterman
OpenWord, New Delhi, India, 2012
http://www.openword.net.in/critical-explorations
Volume 4
The Movements of Movements, Part 1 : What Makes Us Move ?
Edited by Jai Sen
OpenWord, New Delhi, India, and PM Press, Oakland CA, USA, 2017a
Volume 5
The Movements of Movements, Part 2 : Rethinking Our Dance
Edited by Jai Sen
OpenWord, New Delhi, India, and PM Press, Oakland CA, USA, 2017b
6
Contents
The Movements of Movements
Part 2
Rethinking Our Dance
Our world is not just a world of pain, but of dignity. Dignity is the refusal inside us, the refusal to submit, the
refusal to be an object, and therefore it is more than mere refusal.
John Holloway
3
Table of Contents for
The Movements of Movements, Part 1 : What Makes Us Move ?
- for reference only
Acknowledgements & Credits
Notes on the Editors
Notes on the Contributors
0
Invocations
Proem :
Shailja Patel What Moves Us
Introduction :
Jai Sen The Movements of Movements : An Introduction and an Exploration
1
Movementscapes
1.1 David McNally From the Mountains of Chiapas to the Streets of Seattle : This is What Democracy
Looks Like
1.2 Fouad Kalouche and Eric Mielants Antisystemic Movements and Transformations of the World-System,
19681989
1.3 André C Drainville Beyond
Altermondialisme
: Anti-Capitalist Dialectic of Presence
1.4 Tariq Ali Storming Heaven : Where Has The Rage Gone ?
1.5 Taiaiake Alfred and Jeff Corntassel - Being Indigenous : Resurgences against Contemporary Colonialism
1.6 Andrea Smith Indigenous Feminism and the Heteropatriachal State
1.7 Xochitl Leyva Solano Geopolitics of Knowledge and the Neo-Zapatista Social Movement Networks
3
Holloway 2017.
7
2
The Movements of Movements :
Struggles for Other Worlds
2.1 Anand Teltumbde Anti-Imperialism, Dalits, and the Annihilation of Caste
2.2 Jeff Corntassel Rethinking Self-Determination : Lessons from the Indigenous-Rights Discourse
2.3 Xochitl Leyva Solano and Christopher Gunderson - The Tapestry of Neo-Zapatismo : Origins and
Development
2.4 Roma and Ashok Choudhary - Ecological Justice and Forest Right Movements in India : State and
Militancy - New Challenges
2.5 Emilie Hayes Open Space in Movement : Reading Three Waves of Feminism
2.6 Virginia Vargas International Feminisms : New Syntheses, New Directions
2.7 Lee Cormie Re-Creating the World : Communities of Faith in the Struggles for Other Possible Worlds
2.8 François Houtart Mahmoud Mohamed Taha : Islamic Witness in the Contemporary World
2.9 James Toth Local Islam Gone Global : The Roots of Religious Militancy in Egypt and its Transnational
Transformation
2.10 Roel Meijer Fighting for Another World : Yusuf Al-‘Uyairi’s Conceptualisation of Praxis and the
Permanent Salafi Revolution
2.11 Peter Waterman The Networked Internationalism of Labour’s Others
2.12 Cho Hee-YeonFrom Anti-Imperialist to Anti-Empire : The Crystallisation of the Anti-Globalisation
Movement in South Korea
2.13 Emir Sader The Weakest Link ? Neoliberalism in Latin America
2.14 Daniel Bensaïd The Return of Strategy
2.15 Peter North and Dave Featherstone Localisation As Radical Praxis and The New Politics Of Climate
Change
2.16 Guillermo Delgado-P Refounding Bolivia : Exploring the Possibility and Paradox of a Social Movements
State
2.17 Alex Khasnabish - Forward Dreaming : Zapatismo and the Radical Imagination
Afterword
Laurence Cox ‘Learning to be loyal to each other’ : Conversations, alliances, and arguments in the movements
of movements
Annexure :
Jai Sen A Book In and On Movement : Some reflections on the idea and composition of this book
References
Compiled, comprehensive Bibliography for Part I
8
Part 2
Rethinking Our Dance
Acknowledgements & Credits
Notes on the Editors
Notes on the Contributors
Invocations
Proem :
Shailja Patel Offerings
Introduction :
Jai Sen - On Rethinking Our Dance : Some Thoughts, Some Moves
3
Interrogating Movement, Problematising
Movement
3.1 Rodrigo Nunes Nothing Is What Democracy Looks Like : Openness, Horizontality, and The
Movement of Movements
3.2 The Free Association Worlds in Motion : Movements, Problematics, and the Creation of New
Worlds
3.3 Jai Sen Break Free ! Engaging Critically with the Concept and Reality of Civil Society (Part
1)
3.4 Anila Daulatzai - Believing in Exclusion : The Problem of Secularism in Progressive Politics
3.5 Josephine Ho Is Global Governance Bad for East Asian Queers ?
3.6 Jeffrey S Juris and Geoffrey Pleyers Incorporating Youth or Transforming Politics ? Alter-
Activism as an Emerging Mode of Praxis among Young Global Justice Activists
3.7 Tomás Mac Sheoin and Nicola Yeates The Anti-Globalisation Movement : Coalition and
Division
3.8 Stephanie Ross The Strategic Implications of Anti-Statism in the Global Justice Movement
3.9 Michael Löwy Negativity and Utopia in the Alterglobalisation Movement
3.10 Rodrigo Nunes The Global Moment : Seattle, Ten Years On
3.11 Ezequiel Adamovsky Autonomous Politics and its Problems : Thinking the Passage from
Social to Political
3.12 John Brown Childs Boundary as Bridge
3.13 Chris Carlsson Effective Politics or Feeling Effective ?
9
3.14 Massimo De Angelis PR like PRocess ! Strategy from the Bottom Up
3.15 Matt Meyer and Oussenia Alidou The Power of Words : Reclaiming and Re-Imagining
‘Revolution’ and ‘Nonviolence’
3.16 Jai Sen Break Free ! Engaging Critically with the Concept and Reality of Civil Society (Part
2)
4
Reflections on Possible Futures
4.1 Michal Osterweil “Becoming-Woman ?” : Between Theory, Practice, and Potentiality
4.2 John Holloway The Asymmetry of Revolution
4.3 David Graeber The Shock of Victory
4.4 Kolya Abramsky Gathering Our Dignified Rage : Building New Autonomous Global
Relations of Production, Livelihood, and Exchange
4.5 Muto IchiyoTowards the Autonomy of the People of the World : Need for a New Movement
of Movements to Animate People’s Alliance Processes
4.6 Samir Amin Towards a Fifth International ?
4.7 Rodrigo Nunes The Lessons of 2011 : Three Theses on Organisation
4.8 François Houtart ‘We Still Exist’
Afterword
Lee Cormie - Another World Is Inevitable… But Which Other World ?
References
Compiled, comprehensive Bibliography for Part 2
Websites
Index
10
Acknowledgements & Credits
for
The Movements of Movements, Part 2 : Rethinking Our Dance
Jai Sen
This book is the companion volume to its predecessor in the
Challenging Empires
series, The
Movements of Movements, Part 1 : What Makes Us Move ?, and so much of what I say here
will and must be similar. But this volume is also likely to be the last book I will compile and edit,
after a decade and more (and after 8-9 books) of doing this. I have learned a lot in this time, and not
only about compiling books, and so this is also a place for me to bring things and thoughts together.
I want to start these acknowledgements by drawing on the work of someone who I now
consider to be one of my mentors, Taiaiake Alfred, who has in turn also drawn on others which is
as it should be :
We gather together and see that the cycle of life continues. As human beings, we have been given the
responsibility to live in balance and harmony with each other and with all of creation. So now, we bring
our minds together as one as we give greetings and thanks to each other as People.
Now our minds are one.
We are thankful for our mother, the earth, for she gives us all that we need for life. She sustains and
supports us as our feet move upon her. We are joyful in knowing that she continues to care for us as
she has from the beginning of time. To our Mother, we send greetings and thanks.
Now our minds are one.
We give thanks to the waters for quenching our thirst and providing us with strength. Water is life, and
we are thankful for its purity. We know is power in many forms waterfalls and rain, mists and
streams, rivers and oceans. With one mind, we send greetings and thanks to the spirit of the Water.
Now our minds are one.
……………
Now we turn our thoughts to the Creator and to the life-force of the universe. We send greetings and
thanks for all the gifts of creation. Everything we need to live a good life is here in our natural world.
For all of the love that is still around us, we gather our minds together as one and send our choicest
words of greetings for the power of love, life, and creation.
Now our minds are one.
We have now arrived at the place where we end our words. In thanking and acknowledging all of the
things we have named we did not intend to leave anything our. If something was forgotten, we leave it
to each of you to send such greetings as we have spoken, and to offer gratitude in your own way.
Onen enska neiokwanikonra
. Now our minds are one.
4
Many people, and many spirits, have helped to make this book, and its companion and predecessor.
First, and again following Taiaiake Alfred, I want to thank and send my greetings to all “the
true warriors, of all nations and ages who in sharing their thoughts and teachings have shown me the
way and have made this book what it is”.
5
I am not a writer, nor an editor, let alone an academic; I
4
I have drawn here on the invocation at the beginning of the Acknowledgements in Taiaiake Alfred’s book
Wasáse
: Indigenous Pathways of Action and Freedom (Alfred 2005, pp 15-16), which is his adaptation of a
version of the Haudenosaunee Environmental Task Force’s ‘Greetings to the Natural World, published in
Haudenosaunee Environmental Restoration : An Indigenous Strategy for Human Sustainability (Cambridge,
England : Indigenous Development International, 1995). I encourage all readers to go to Taiaiake Alfred’s book
to read the full version.
5
Ibid, p 16.
11
was brought to this path in 2002 by my good friend and fellow spirit Jeremy Brecher, in the course of
the studies and reflections I was then doing on the dynamics of movement, and where having shown
me the path he then left me to follow it; and I have followed this path since then.
There is no question that I am most indebted, in what I have managed to draw together here
and in its companion volume, to all the contributors to these two books who are listed by name in
the ‘Notes on the Contributors’, in this volume and in its companion and to all my colleagues at
CACIM and at OpenWord, who I list out further on below. It has been an extraordinary privilege to
have walked this part of my life’s journey with you, and I thank you all. My words cannot begin to
repay my debts.
But I want to take this opportunity to also remember, acknowledge, and honour here
however, in this last compilation, all those who I have met and worked with in the course of my
journeys over these past forty years and more, in India and elsewhere, in activism and in research,
sometimes together with others and sometimes alone, and who I have drawn on in innumerable
ways, in this book and in the others that I have done :
o In the course of our work at Unnayan, the action group I was first with and then through the
NCHR (the National Campaign for Housing Rights) both the members of the group but also
including the members of the many communities of struggling, labouring people we worked
with, many through the Chhinnamul Sramajibi Adhikar Samiti (‘Organisation for the Rights of
Uprooted Labouring People’), the experience of which re-educated and radicalised me and
literally changed my life;
o In the course of the work I did with others in building the Habitat International Coalition;
o In the course of the research I did through the 1990s on movement and on the globalisation
of movement, in India and Brazil and in many other parts of the world, and especially for the
trust that all those I met and interviewed and again, especially those in ‘communities’ -
placed in me;
o In the course of all the gatherings of the World Social Forum that I have taken part in; and
o In the course of the work we have done over the past decade and more at and through
CACIM.
For the hope that we have sipped on together, for the fires we have lit; for the barriers we have
taken down, for the spaces we have opened; for the moments we have shared. My words cannot
begin to repay my debts.
I also want here to acknowledge my teachers and mentors, over the years : Among them and
in particular, the late Peter Gutkind; the late Ray Affleck; John F C Turner; the late Rajni Kothari; the
late John Berger; Jeremy Brecher; John Brown Childs; and more recently, Taiaiake Alfred. My words
cannot begin to repay my debts.
And finally, and in dealing with my past and as I start a new journey, I want also to honour
and acknowledge here my debt to my family : First, to my late first wife Munni (Anita) Sen, for her
love and for her support to me through my early years as an organiser when I came to be moved and
to learn how to dance, and then through my years as a wandering student of movement, till her
sudden death in 2002. I want also to honour her here, for all that she did in her life and for the love
and purpose she gave me and our children and that she brought to so many; and in remembering
her, I remember also her parents and the unstinting love and support that they gave us as a family
through those many, quite difficult years. I want also to thank and honour my daughters, Jayita and
Diya, for bearing with me through all these years, and including through all the years when I was so
lost in my work that I was never really with them; and also my partner and my wife till late 2015,
Julia Sánchez, for her support and her always-critical encouragement. And I remember and honour
too my father, Buddha Sen, and my mother Nita Sen, who brought me into this world but who I
never really knew.
My words cannot begin to repay my debts.
Content Editors
Beyond the features discussed in the Introduction, an important background feature of this book has
been the intensive and extensive background work that has gone into the preparation and finalisation
of the essays we are publishing (as is the case with the companion volume to this book, The
Movements of Movements, Part 1 : What Makes Us Move ? and with all the books in the
Challenging
Empires
series to which this book belongs). The Content Editors for this book - and I as editor - have
tried hard to work closely with our authors in helping them more fully develop and articulate their
12
ideas, and I have therefore of course been very happy indeed that so many of our authors have
openly appreciated this and said that they have rarely experienced this degree of attention. Most of
the credit for this of course goes to our Content Editors, Parvati Sharma and Vipul Rikhi, and I want
to warmly thank them for their contribution to making this book what it is.
Since this book is being published in two Parts see the Introduction , I here list
acknowledgements and credits only for the material in Part 2. The chapters are listed here in
alphabetical order by the author’s surname :
Parvati Sharma, for :
David Graeber The Shock of Victory
Michael Löwy Negativity and Utopia in the Global Justice Movement
Michal Osterweil “Becoming-Woman ?” : Between Theory, Practice, and Potentiality
Parvati Sharma and Jai Sen, for :
Samir Amin Towards a Fifth International ?
Massimo De Angelis PR like PRocess ! Strategy from the Bottom Up
Jeffrey S Juris and Geoffrey Pleyers Incorporating Youth or Transforming Politics ? Alter-Activism as
an Emerging Mode of Praxis among Young Global Justice Activists
Rodrigo Nunes Nothing Is What Democracy Looks Like : Openness, Horizontality, and The
Movement of Movements
Vipul Rikhi, for :
Ezequiel Adamovsky Autonomous Politics and its Problems : Thinking the Passage from the Social to
the Political
John Brown Childs Boundary as Bridge
John Holloway The Asymmetry of Revolution
Vipul Rikhi and Jai Sen, for :
Kolya Abramsky Gathering Our Dignified Rage : Building New Autonomous Global
Relations of Production, Livelihood, and Exchange
Anila Daulatzai - Believing in Exclusion : The Problem of Secularism in Progressive Politics
Chris Carlsson Effective Politics or Feeling Effective ?
Tomás Mac Sheoin and Nicola Yeates The Anti-Globalisation Movement : Coalition and Division
Muto IchiyoTowards the Autonomy of the People of the World : Need for a New Movement of
Movements to Animate People’s Alliance Processes
Stephanie Ross The Strategic Implications of Anti-Statism in the Global Justice Movement
Jai Sen Lifting The Veil, Removing the Mask : Looking at the Concept and Reality of Civil Society in
His Face (Parts 1 and 2)
Jai Sen, for :
Lee Cormie - Another World Is Inevitable… But Which Other World ?
The Free Association Worlds in Motion : Movements, Problematics, and the Creation of New Worlds
Josephine Ho Is Global Governance Bad for East Asian Queers ?
François Houtart ‘We Still Exist’
Matt Meyer and Oussenia AlidouThe Power of Words : Reclaiming and Re-Imagining ‘Revolution’
and ‘Nonviolence’
Rodrigo Nunes The Global Moment : Seattle, Ten Years On
Rodrigo Nunes The Lessons of 2011 : Three Theses on Organisation.
Concept, Design, and Production
As discussed in the Introduction to Part 1 (and therefore not repeated here),
6
my working with
OpenWord has been an integral part of the conceptualisation and reality of this book as a book and
as an ebook -, and as in the case of the immediately-previous book in the
Challenging Empires
series
6
Sen 2017a.
13
(World Social Forum : Critical Explorations)
7
much of the credit for this goes to Nishant, my former
Co-Coordinator at OpenWord. My warm thanks to him once again, for accompanying me down this
road for several years.
In the case of this book and its companion volume however, I have had the great privilege of
also having the partnership of new volunteers and fellow-travellers : Giulio Maffini, an old friend I
have had the privilege of rediscovering recently, for nudging me into the use of diagrams to unpack
and open up the meanings of the sometimes dense content of this book (and of my writing !); Yih
Lerh Huang, a new friend and colleague, for joining Giulio Maffini in nudging me into the use of
diagrams in the book, and for infusing fresh energy and professionalism into our work at OpenWord;
and Christina Sanchez, for generating the Wordle diagrams that we used in Part 1 and for thereby
showing me the path to the ones I generated for this book - and more generally, for her enthusiasm
and her creative and critical engagement with my work. And most recently, I have also received the
generous help of another new friend, Jim Coflin, in dealing with the many technical issues of
compiling all the text into the one file required by our co-publishers, PM Press, and for thereby
helping ease the pain of giving birth to this book.
My warm appreciation to all four, for their ideas and contributions and for their critical
engagement and encouragement.
Rights and Permissions
In addition to the mentions that we have made in the first endnote of the respective essays, I am
happy to also warmly acknowledge here the permission we have got from the following publishers for
re-publishing the following essays in this book, which they had earlier published :
The journal ephemera for Massimo De Angelis’ essay ‘PR like PRocess ! Strategy from the
Bottom Up’
The journal Labour, Capital, and Society for Stephanie Ross’ essay ‘The Strategic Implications
of Anti-Statism in the Global Justice Movement’
The journal Radical Philosophy for Rodrigo Nunes’ essay ‘The Global Moment’.
As readers will notice, we have used Wordle diagrams (http://www.wordle.net/) in both this book and
its companion volume. I would like to also warmly acknowledge here the open permission on which
the designer of Wordle diagrams, Jonathan Feinberg, has made available the results of using his
software.
Material Resources
As in the case of the earlier book in
Challenging Empires
series, World Social Forum : Critical
Explorations, I would like to acknowledge the support we at CACIM received back in 2007-9 from
Oxfam-Novib, based in The Netherlands, for covering professional editorial expenses during the early
stages of the preparation of what has become this book and its companion volume, as a part of a
grant that they made available to us titled ‘The World Social Forum : A Critical Engagement’ (Project
No BORX-505275-4713). As discussed in the Introduction both in the companion volume to this book
and in its predecessor, all these books have in many ways come out of our experience of working
through that period.
I would also like to thank InterPares, Canada, for its supplementary support in 2009 for our
work around the World Social Forum. Even if its grant was limited and not really support for our
books as such, this act of solidarity when we at CACIM needed support was very important for what
we were then more generally trying to do with respect to the WSF, and in a more general way for our
broader project of working with movement worldwide, and where its support therefore also helped
this particular project move forward.
Networking as Resource : The CACIM Community as Cloud
Finally, as editor I again also want to note and acknowledge the fact that as was also the case with
its predecessor, this book is the product of an immense amount of almost global networking over
several years, between several people and in different permutations and combinations over the years;
and indeed, that a book like this is perhaps only possible through such a cloud-like process. Aside
7
Sen and Waterman, eds, 2012.
14
from a certain amount of professional support for which we were initially able to raise funds for, as
mentioned above, the bulk of the conceptualisation of this book (and also of the book project outlined
in the Introduction) and then its preparation has involved intense voluntary input from almost
countless individuals, over these many years :
All the contributors - whose names are given in the Table of Contents and in the document
‘Notes on the Contributors’ and without whom, of course, this book would just not have
been possible;
All the members of a loose, amorphous, and constantly evolving ‘
Challenging Empires
editorial collective’ including Michal Osterweil and Lee Cormie, at different times, and Peter
Waterman, my co-editor of the
Challenging Empires
series;
All members of the OpenWord Working Group;
Adityan M, of New Delhi, who was earlier our graphic designer at CACIM, with whom it was
always fun and thought-provoking to discuss ways to represent what we are trying to do and
the ideas and worlds we are trying to engage with, including for early drafts for the cover of
this book; and
Matt Meyer, of Brooklyn, in the US, who has more recently come on board this project and
journey and with whom I am collaborating in our ongoing work at CACIM of conceiving and
formulating a larger book project around the material in these books; and where he has also
played the vital role in this project of introducing me, and our original publisher OpenWord,
to PM Press, as a result of which the two are now co-publishing the two volumes of The
Movements of Movements.
All of these people all of whom were or became members of the CACIM Community through this
fact of association - have made key contributions to the crystallisation of this book and of this book
project over these years, in different ways and at different levels. I warmly thank them all !
15
Notes on the Editors
Jai Sen is an architect by training and first practice, became an activist around the rights of the
labouring poor in Kolkata, India, in the mid 1970s, and then moved on to becoming a student of the
history and dynamics of movement and of the globalisation of movement in the 1990s. Involved in
the organising process of the World Social Forum in India during its first year there, 2002, he has
since then intensively engaged with and taken part in the WSF and world movements through the
organisation he is with, CACIM (Critical Action : Centre in Movement), including as author, editor,
and/or co-editor of several books and articles on the WSF and as moderator of the listserve
WSFDiscuss. While living in Kolkata from the mid 70s to the late 90s, he was with Unnayan, a social
action group, Vice-President of the
Chhinnamul Sramajibi Adhikar Samiti
(‘Organisation for the Rights
of Uprooted Labouring People’), and Convenor of the NCHR (National Campaign for Housing Rights)
in India, and he also represented Unnayan on the founding Board of the Habitat International
Coalition during 1987-91. He is now based in New Delhi, India, and Ottawa, Canada.
jai.sen@cacim.net
Notes on the Contributing Editor and Co-Series Editor :
Since retirement from the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, in 1998, Peter Waterman has
published various monographs, (co-)edited compilations and numerous academic and political papers
the latter almost all to be found online -, and written and published his autobiography. His work has
been published in English (UK, USA, Canada, India), Hindi, Italian, Portuguese, German, Spanish,
Japanese, and Korean. He has papers posted on the Montevideo-based Choike
portal and books on
the Finland-based Into
website, and a blog on UnionBook. He is currently associated with, amongst
others, the Programa Democracia y Transformación Global (Lima), with two online journals,
Interface: a Journal for and about Social Movements and the Global Labour Journal, and with the
Indian Institute for Critical Action - Centre in Movement (CACIM) in New Delhi. Here he has co-edited
books on the World Social Forums. Since retirement he has had invitations for teaching, lectures, and
seminars from universities and/or movement-oriented bodies in Peru, South Africa, Sweden, Finland,
Hongkong, Germany, South Korea, the US, Ireland, and the UK.
peterwaterman1936@gmail.com
Notes on the Contributors
to
The Movements of Movements
Part 2
Rethinking Our Dance
The contributors to this volume are as follows,
listed alphabetically by
first name
:
[NB : Please note that the entry for Muto Ichiyo is under M, since - though ‘Muto’ is his surname -, as per normal
custom in Japan he is commonly referred to as ‘Muto san’.]
Anila Daulatzai, born and raised in Los Angeles, California, completed her PhD in Sociocultural
Anthropology at the Johns Hopkins University in the USA. She has taught in the USA at the University
of California and the Johns Hopkins University, in Afghanistan at Kabul University and the American
University of Afghanistan, and in Switzerland at the University of Zürich. She is currently teaching at
the Lahore University of Management Sciences in Pakistan. She has extensive experience of living in
the Khyber Pukhtunkhwa region of Pakistan and in Afghanistan - where she primarily worked among
refugees and internally displaced people in the Afghan-Pakistani border region in the field of refugee
health care and trained Afghan researchers in Afghanistan -, and of mobilising for various social
justice issues around the world over the past twenty years. She has published articles in various peer-
reviewed social science journals, and written chapters in books on topics ranging from widows in
Afghanistan to a critique of radical progressive politics. She is currently working on her new
anthropological research project on heroin users in Pakistan and Afghanistan and is writing an
academic book based on her more than four years of anthropological research in Kabul on the topic
of widowhood and care.
adaulatzai@gmail.com
Chris Carlsson, director of the multimedia history project Shaping San Francisco, is a writer,
publisher, editor, and community organiser. For twenty-five years he has focused on horizontal
communications, organic communities, and public space. He was one of the founders, editors, and
frequent contributors to the groundbreaking San Francisco magazine Processed World, and helped
launch the monthly bike-ins called Critical Mass. He has edited four books, most recently The Political
Edge (2004, City Lights Foundation), and published his first novel, After The Deluge, in 2004 (Full
Enjoyment Books), and his book Nowtopia was published in 2008. He is a member of Media Workers’
Union Local 100 in San Francisco, and recent board president of CounterPULSE, an arts organisation
where he has produced a series of public talks since 2006, and conducted award-winning bicycle
history tours for over a decade. His website : http://www.chriscarlsson.com.
cc@chriscarlsson.com
David Graeber, currently a Professor of Anthropology at the London School of Economics and
formerly an associate professor of anthropology at Goldsmiths College in London and before that at
Yale University in the USA, has worked with the Direct Action Network, People’s Global Action, the
Planetary Alternatives Network, the IWW, and the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York. His
books include Towards an Anthropological Theory of Value : The False Coin of Our Own Dreams
(Palgrave 2001), Fragments of an Anarchist Anthropology (Prickly Paradigm Press, 2004), Lost People
: Magic and the Legacy of Slavery in Madagascar (Indiana, 2007), Possibilities : Essays in Hierarchy,
Rebellion, and Desire and Direct Action : An Ethnography (both from AK Press, 2007 and 2009), Debt
: The First 5,000 Years (Melville House, 2011), and The Democracy Project : A History, a Crisis, a
Movement (Spiegel & Grau, 2013).
d.graeber@lse.ac.uk
2
After graduating at the University of Buenos Aires, in Argentina, Ezequiel Adamovsky obtained a
PhD from University College London. He is currently Professor at the UBA and Researcher at
CONICET, Argentina’s highest research public body, and has been Guest Researcher at the CNRS in
Paris; and is the author of Euro-Orientalism (Oxford, 2006) and
Historia de la clase media argentina
[‘History of middle class Argentina’, in Spanish] (Buenos Aires, 2009), among other books. In 2009 he
was awarded the James Alexander Robertson Memorial Prize, and in 2013 the Premio Nacional, the
highest distinction of the Argentinean state for arts and humanities. As an activist, Ezequiel has been
involved in the students’ movement and in the Neighbours’ Assemblies movement that emerged in
Buenos Aires after the rebellion of 2001. He has written extensively on issues of globalisation, anti-
capitalism, and Leftist politics for websites and journals in several countries, and has published
Anticapitalismo para principiantes
[’Anticapitalism for Beginners’, in Spanish] (Buenos Aires, 2003)
and
Más allá de la vieja izquierda : Seis ensayos para un nuevo anticapitalismo
[‘Beyond The Old Left
: Six essays for a new anti-capitalism’, in Spanish] (Buenos Aires 2007).
e.adamovsky@gmail.com
http://ezequieladamovsky.blogspot.com.ar/
François Houtart, a Catholic priest, liberation theologian, and scholar, is presently Professor at the
Instituto de Altos Estudios Nacionales (National Institute of Higher Studies) in Quito, Ecuador;
associated with the Fundación del Pueblo Indio del Ecuador (Foundation of the Indigenous Peoples of
Ecuador); and Vice President of the World Forum for Alternatives. He was the founder of CETRI
(Centre Tricontinental), a Belgian non-governmental organisation, and Special Representative of the
President of the General Assembly of the UN in the Commission on the Reforms of the Financial and
Monetary System, headed by Joseph Stiglitz. He is one of the initiators of the World Social Forum,
and was former chair of the International League for the Liberation of the Peoples and an expert for
the Vatican Council II. As a sociologist, he has written more than forty books, and he founded the
magazine
Alternatives Sud
.
houtart@hotmail.com
The Free Association (http://freelyassociating.org/) is an ongoing experiment. We’re mainly based
in the North of England although we find ourselves at home nowhere (and everywhere). Sometimes
we appear to be tight-knit, acting and thinking in close concert with each other. At other times we’re
more of a loose network, expanding and contracting as the need arises. A reading group, a writing
machine, an affinity group… Our most recent work together is Moments of Excess : Movements,
Protest and Everyday Life (PM Press, 2011). Alex, Brian, David, Keir, Nate, and Nette freely
associated to produce this particular essay.
info@freelyassociating.org
Geoffrey Pleyers (PhD, EHESS 2006) is FNRS Researcher and a Professor of Sociology at the
Université Catholique de Louvain, in Belgium. He teaches social movements and global studies at the
University of Louvain and at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, France, and is
an invited professor at several universities in Europe and Latin America. He is the 2014-2019
President of the Research Committee 47 on ‘Social movements’ of the International Sociological
Association, the chair of the Research Network on Social Movements of the French Sociological
Association, and a founding member of the coordination committee of the Mexican Research Network
on Social Movements. He is also the founding editor of the web journal Open Movements : For a
global and public sociology of social movements. His publications include
Forums Sociaux Mondiaux et
défis de l’altermondialisme
[‘World Social Forums and the challenges of alter-globalisation’, in French]
(Academia, 2007);
Los movimientos sociales
[‘Social movements’, in Spanish], Mexico : Anthropos;
Alter-globalization : Becoming an Actor in the Global Age (Polity Press, 2010), and
La consummation
critique
[‘Critical consumption’, in French] (Desclée de Brouwer, 2010).
Geoffrey.Pleyers@uclouvain.be, http://uclouvain.academia.edu/GeoffreyPleyers
Jai Sen, an architect and urban designer by training and first practice, became an activist around the
rights of the labouring poor in Kolkata, India, in the mid 1970s, and moved on to becoming a student
of the history and dynamics of movement and of the globalisation of movement in the 1990s.
Involved in the organising process of the World Social Forum in India during its first year there, 2002,
3
he has since then intensively engaged with and taken part in the WSF and world movement through
the organisation he is with, CACIM (Critical Action : Centre in Movement), including as author, editor,
and/or co-editor of several books and articles on the WSF and as moderator of the listserve
WSFDiscuss. While in Kolkata, he was with Unnayan, a social action group, Vice-President of the
Chhinnamul Sramajibi Adhikar Samiti
(‘Organisation for the Rights of Uprooted Labouring People’),
and Convenor of the NCHR (National Campaign for Housing Rights) in India, and represented
Unnayan on the founding Board of the Habitat International Coalition during 1987-91. He is now
based in New Delhi, India, and Ottawa, Canada.
jai.sen@cacim.net
Jeffrey S Juris, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Northeastern University, in Boston, has
participated extensively as an activist and researcher in the global justice movement, including the
WSF and the PGA. He is author of Networking Futures : The Movements against Corporate
Globalization (Duke University Press, 2008), which explores the cultural logic and politics of
transnational networking among anti-corporate globalisation activists, a co-author of Global
Democracy and the World Social Forums (Paradigm Press, 2008), and co-editor with Alex Khasnabish
of Insurgent Encounters : Transnational Activism, Ethnography, and the Political (Duke University
Press, 2013). He has also published numerous articles on this topic as well as the relationship
between new digital technologies and grassroots social movements.
jeffjuris@yahoo.com
John Brown Childs, of mixed African-American and Native American descent, was Professor,
Sociology Department, at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in the US. Deeply influenced by
Haudenosaunee philosophy, he is author of Transcommunality : From the Politics of Conversion to the
Ethics of Respect (Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2003); co-editor with Jeremy Brecher and
Jill Cutler of Global Visions, Beyond the New World Order (Boston, Mass : South End Press, 1993);
and founder and editor of Transcommunal Cooperation, http://transcommunality.org/.
jbchilds@ucsc.edu
John Holloway is a Professor at the Instituto de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades ‘Alfonso Vélez
Pliego’ in Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Puebla, Mexico. He has published on Marxist
theory, on the Zapatista movement (especially Zapatista, edited with Eloína Peláez, Pluto Press,
London, 1998), and on the new forms of anti-capitalist struggle. His most important books are
Change the World Without Taking Power : The Meaning of Revolution Today
(Pluto Press, London,
2002; revised and expanded edition 2005), and Crack Capitalism (Pluto, London, 2010).
johnholloway@prodigy.net.mx
Josephine Ho, the foremost feminist sex-radical scholar in East Asia, has been writing extensively
and provocatively on many cutting-edge issues, spearheading sex-positive views in the region on
female sexuality, gender/sexuality education, queer studies, sex-work studies, and transgenderism.
She is best-known for her ground-breaking, sex-positive writing on female sexuality, The Gallant
Woman : Feminism and Sex Emancipation, published in 1994 in the midst of a sex revolution in
Taiwan (written in Chinese; ISBN: 978-957-33-1121-6). She founded and continues to head the
Center for the Study of Sexualities at National Central University, Taiwan (http://sex.ncu.edu.tw),
widely known for its social activism and intellectual stamina.
sexenter@cc.ncu.edu.tw
Kolya Abramsky has worked for twenty years as an organiser, educator, researcher, and
campaigner on a range of different global justice and anti-capitalist processes. This includes working
with a range of different types of organizations, including both anti-authoritarian ones and also
democratic-centralist ones. Originally from the UK, he has lived in and worked from a number of
countries in western Europe and the USA, and more recently, South Africa. He is currently based in
the UK, where he is doing freelance work. For the last 15 years he has worked on the labour, social,
and environmental conflicts in the global energy sector, and on organisational processes related to an
anti-capitalist energy transition. He has worked as the International Energy Officer for the National
Union of Metalworkers of South Africa, and has also been the coordinator of the World Wind Energy
Institute, based in Denmark. He has edited two books, Sparking a World Wide Energy Revolution :
4
Social Struggles in the Transition to a Post-petrol World
(2010, AK Press), and Restructuring and
Resistance : Diverse Voices of Struggle in Western Europe (2001, self-published). He was formerly a
Visiting International Scholar and winner of the Manfred-Heindler Award for Energy and Climate
Change Research at the Institute of Advanced Studies in Science, Technology and Society, in Graz,
Austria.
kolyaab@yahoo.co.uk
Laurence Cox co-edits the open-access, activist/academic social movements journal Interface
(http://interfacejournal.net) and co-directs the MA in Community Education, Equality and Social
Activism at the National University of Ireland Maynooth. He has been involved in many different
movements and campaigns, in Ireland and internationally, over the past three decades, focussing
particularly on building alliances between different movements and communities in pursuit of a more
radical vision and practice. As a researcher and writer he has focussed particularly on the
development of movements’ own ‘intellectual means of production’, in collaboration with activists and
popular educators inside and outside academia. He is co-author of We Make Our Own History :
Marxism and Social Movements in the Twilight of Neoliberalism (Pluto, 2014) and co-editor of
Understanding European Movements : New Social Movements, Global Justice Struggles, Anti-Austerity
Protest (Routledge, 2013); Marxism and Social Movements (Brill / Haymarket, 2013); and Silence
Would be Treason : Last Writings of Ken Saro-Wiwa (Daraja, 2013).
laurencecox.wordpress.com; laurence.cox@nuim.ie
Lee Cormie has been a researcher / teacher / writer and sometime activist concerning social justice
movements and coalitions since the 1970s. In addition to publishing articles on Christian liberation
theologies and social movements, he has been involved in church-based social justice initiatives in the
US and Canada, and most recently as a participant/observer in World Social Forum events. Over the
years he has been especially interested in the debates about grassroots movements and traditions of
critical discourse concerning ‘liberation theologies’ and social movements, ‘social systems’, ‘systemic’
injustices, and ‘alternatives’, translation across cultures and movements, and emerging
epistemological diversity in a new ecology of knowledges. He recently retired as a professor of
theology and interdisciplinary studies in the Faculty of Theology, the University of St Michael’s College
and the Toronto School of Theology, in Toronto, Canada.
lee.cormie@utoronto.ca
Massimo De Angelis is a critical political economist working at the University of East London. He is
the author of several publications on value theory, the link between capital’s globalisation and social
struggles, commons and social change, and the political reading of economic narrative. His most
recent book, The Beginning of History : Value Struggle and Global Capital, was published in 2007 by
Pluto Press. He edits the web journal The Commoner (www.thecommoner.org), where he also keeps
a blog.
m.deangelis@ntlworld.com, commoning@gmail.com
Matt Meyer is a New York City-based author, educator and activist who currently serves as
coordinator of the War Resisters International Africa Support Network and a UN NGO/ECOSOC
representative of the International Peace Research Association. A former draft registration resister
and organiser for the Progressive Student Network, Meyer’s recent books include the two-volume Pan
African peace-building series Seeds of New Hope (2008) and Seeds Bearing Fruit (2010), as well
as We Have Not Been Moved : Resisting Racism and Militarism in 21
st
Century
America (2012). Argentine Nobel Peace laureate Adolfo Perez Esquivel has commented that “Meyer is
a natural coalition-builder”, one who “provides tools for today’s activists” in his writings and his work;
South African Nobel laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu, in commenting on Meyer’s first book (Guns
and Gandhi in Africa, co-authored with Bill Sutherland), wrote that “Sutherland and Meyer have
begun to develop a language which looks at the roots of our humanness”.
resistanceinbrooklyn.ows@gmail.com
Michael Löwy, Research Director Emeritus in Sociology at the National Centre for Scientific
Research, Paris, is a Franco-Brazilian Marxist intellectual. He is a frequent contributor to New Left
Review, Socialist Register,
and International Viewpoint; his work has been translated into twenty-nine
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languages. His recent books include Walter Benjamin : Fire Alarm (London : Verso, 2001) and The
Theory of Revolution in Young Marx (Chicago : Haymarket, 2004).
lowym@free.fr
Michal Osterweil teaches Global Studies at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, in the
USA. Her courses and research focus on social movements and paradigms of social change. She has
participated and written about the ‘Global Justice Movement’ and related transnational networks, in
particular those affiliated with Zapatismo and the World and regional Social Forums. She is a student
of the new ways of ‘doing change’, ranging from movements like the Zapatistas and the alter-
globalisation movement to place-based, environmental and transformative movements in the US -
what she understands as a ‘new political imaginary’ being simultaneously discovered and created in a
variety of spaces and movements. In addition to her academic work she participates in various
additional projects and activist endeavours, including being co-founder of the Carrboro Greenspace
(carrborogreenspace.org) and the journal Turbulence: Ideas for Movement (www.turbulence.org.uk).
mosterweil@mac.com
Muto Ichiyo is an activist-writer on political and social affairs, national and global. Born in 1931 in
Tokyo, he joined the student and peace movements in the 1950s; was active in the anti-Vietnam War
movement in the 1960s; founded the English journals AMPO
(1969) and the Pacific-Asia Resource
Center (1973); initiated the People's Plan 21 in the 1980s, and in the 1990s founded the People's Plan
Study Group (PPSG) of which he served as a co-president until 2007; and taught at the sociology
department of State University of New York at Binghamton, in the US, during the 1980s-90s.
mutoi@mrj.biglobe.ne.jp
Nicola Yeates is Professor of Social Policy at The Open University in Milton Keynes, England. She
researches global(isation) and regional(isation) processes as they impact on poverty, health, and
social welfare. She is a former Editor of Global Social Policy and is Chair of the Editorial Board of
Social Policy and Society. Her publications include Globalisation and Social Policy (Sage, 2001),
Globalising Care Economies, Migrating Workers (Palgrave, 2009), Understanding Global Social Policy
(The Policy Press, 2008 1
st
ed, 2014 2
nd
ed), and (with Chris Holden) The Global Social Policy Reader
(The Policy Press, 2009).
N.Yeates@open.ac.uk
Oussenia Alidou, Director of the Center for African Studies and Distinguished Professor in the
Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literature at Rutgers
University, is based both in New Jersey and Niamey. A leader in the African Studies Association and
the Association of Concerned African Scholars, Dr. Alidou is the recipient of numerous academic
awards for her writing and research on Muslim women and post-colonial societies. A long-standing
activist as well as academic, Alidou has organized both for women’s rights and for an end to
IMF/World Bank/neoliberal structural adjustment throughout the world. Dr Alidou’s current work
focuses on post-conflict reconstruction and the development issues needed for lasting peace; she is a
Steering Committee member of the Pan-African Nonviolence and Peace-building Network. Author of
the acclaimed Engaging Modernity : Muslim Women and the Politics of Agency in Postcolonial Niger
(2011), Alidou’s most recent book is Muslim Women in Postcolonial Kenya : Leadership,
Representation, and Social Change (2013).
oalidou@scarletmail.rutgers.edu
Rodrigo Nunes is a lecturer in contemporary and modern philosophy at the Catholic University of
Rio (PUC-Rio), in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In both Brazil and the UK, he has participated in different
community and labour organising projects, as well as in the organisation of the International Youth
Camp and the World Social Forum. He is a member of the editorial collective
of Turbulence (www.turbulence.org.uk), and his texts have appeared in such publications as Radical
Philosophy, Deleuze Studies, Ephemera, Mute, Transform, Serrote,
Les Temps Modernes
, The
Guardian, and Al Jazeera, and also in several anthologies. His latest publication is the book The
Organisation of the Organisationless : Collective Action After Networks (London : Mute), which
attempts to develop a philosophy of political organisation adequate to the networked movements of
recent years.
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rgnunes@yahoo.com
Samir Amin is Director, Third World Forum, located in Dakar, Senegal, and Chair, World Forum for
Alternatives, based in Cairo, Egypt, and in Louvain, Belgium. An economist and intellectual, he is
regarded as one of the foremost thinkers on the changing dynamics of capitalism. Since 2001, he has
been actively associated with the World Social Forum as well as the regional fora. Amin has authored
many articles and books, including Accumulation on a world scale (1970), Transforming the revolution
: Social movements and the world system (1990), Beyond US Hegemony : Assessing the Prospects
for a Multipolar World (2006), A Life Looking Forward : Memoirs of An Independent Marxist (2006),
Ending the Crisis of Capitalism or Ending Capitalism ? (2010); Global History : A View from the South
(2011), and The People’s Spring : The Future of the Arab Rebellion (2012); and with François
Houtart, in 2002, he edited
Mondialisation de resistances : L’etat des lutes 2002
(‘The Globalisation of
Resistance : The State of the Struggles 2002’, in French), Paris : L’Harmattan / Forum Mondial des
Alternatives.
Samir.Amin@wanadoo.fr
Shailja Patel is an internationally acclaimed Kenyan poet, writer, and public intellectual. Her first
book, Migritude, published in Italy, Sweden and the US, was #1 on Amazon’s bestsellers in Asian
Poetry, and was shortlisted for Italy's Camaiore Poetry Prize. Patel was African Guest Writer
at Sweden's Nordic Africa Institute and poet-in-residence at the Tallberg Forum. She has appeared on
the BBC World Service, NPR and Al-Jazeera, and published by
Le Monde Diplomatique
and The Africa
Report, among others. Her work has been translated into 16 languages. Honors include a Sundance
Theatre Fellowship, a Creation Fund Award from the National Performance Network, the Fanny-Ann
Eddy Poetry Award from IRN-Africa, the Voices of Our Nations Poetry Award, a Lambda Slam
Championship, and the Outwrite Poetry Prize. Patel is a founding member of the civil society coalition
Kenyans For Peace, Truth and Justice. The African Women's Development Fund named her one of
Fifty Inspirational African Feminists for the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day. Poetry
Africa honored her as Letters To Dennis Poet, continuing the legacy of renowned South African anti-
apartheid activist Dennis Brutus. She represented Kenya at Poetry Parnassus, in the London Cultural
Olympiad.
shailja@shailja.com, www.shailja.com
Stephanie Ross is Associate Professor of Work and Labour Studies in the Department of Social
Science and co-director of the Global Labour Research Centre at York University in Toronto, Canada.
Her research and teaching focuses in part on democracy in working-class and social movement
organizations. Her 2003 essay in The Socialist Register, ‘Is This What Democracy Looks Like ? The
Politics of the Anti-Globalization Movement in North America’, has been widely cited by social
movement scholars around the world. With Larry Savage, she has edited two books, Rethinking the
Politics of Labour in Canada (Fernwood 2012), and Public Sector Unions in the Age of
Austerity (Fernwood 2013). She is also president of the Canadian Association for Work and Labour
Studies.
stephr@yorku.ca
Tomás Mac Sheoin is an independent scholar who writes about the chemical industry and social
movements and has long been involved in anti-nuclear and anti-toxic campaigns including in solidarity
work around the Bhopal chemical catastrophe since 1985. His most recent book is Asphyxiating Asia
(Mapusa, Goa : Other India Press, 2003); together with Nicola Yeates, he is also the author of
‘Policing Anti-Globalization Protests : Patterns and Variations in State Responses’, in Samir Dasgupta
and Jan Nederveen Pieterse, eds, Politics of Globalization (New Delhi : Sage, 2009); and among other
writings, he also co-edited in 2015 a special issue of the journal Social Justice to mark the 30th
anniversary of the Bhopal catastrophe.
tomas.x@ireland.com